March 11, 2022

A “Hot Jupiter’s” Dark Side Revealed in Detail for First Time

SpaceTime Series 25 Episode 30
*A “hot Jupiter’s” dark side is revealed in detail for first time
Astronomers have obtained the clearest view yet of the perpetual dark side of a hot Jupiter exoplanet that is “tidally locked” to its host star. The...


SpaceTime Series 25 Episode 30
*A “hot Jupiter’s” dark side is revealed in detail for first time
Astronomers have obtained the clearest view yet of the perpetual dark side of a hot Jupiter exoplanet that is “tidally locked” to its host star. The observations reported in the journal Nature Astronomy have been combined with measurements of the planet’s permanent day side to provide the first detailed view of an exoplanet’s global atmosphere.
*New measurement for the mass of the Neutrino
Scientists have determined the mass of the neutrino at less than 0.8 electron volts. The findings reported in the journal Nature physics will help sciences understanding of the Universe.
*New weather satellite rockets into orbit
America's newest weather satellite has successfully reached geostationary orbit. The mission flew aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch complex 41 from the Cape Canaveral Space Force Base in Florida.
*March SkyWatch
The March equinox, the constellations Taurus the bull, Leo the lion and the Gemini twins Pollux and Castor, And don’t forget March 14 is pi day and Albert Einstein’s birthday are among the many features this month on Skywatch…

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The Astronomy, Space, Technology & Science News Podcast.

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Jonathan Nally

Editor Australian Sky & Telescope Magazine

Our editor, Jonathan Nally, is well known to members of both the amateur and professional astronomical communities. In 1987 he founded Australia’s first astronomy magazine, Sky & Space, and in 2005 became the launch editor for Australian Sky & Telescope. He has written for other major science magazines and technology magazines, and has authored, contributed to or edited many astronomy, nature, history and technology books. In 2000 the Astronomical Society of Australia awarded him the inaugural David Allen Prize for Excellence in the promotion of Astronomy to the public.